Three Line Break Charts

What are Three Line Break Charts Invented in Japan, Three Line Break charts ignore time and only change when prices move a certain amount. In this regard, these charts are quite similar to Point & Figure charts. Three Line Break charts show a series of vertical white and black lines. White lines represent rising prices, while black lines portray falling prices. Prices continue in the same direction until a reversal is warranted. A reversal occurs when the closing price exceeds the high or low of the prior two lines. Construction…

All you need to know about volume

What is ‘Volume’ Volume is the number of shares or contracts traded in a security or an entire market during a given period of time. For every buyer, there is a seller, and each transaction contributes to the count of total volume. That is, when buyers and sellers agree to make a transaction at a certain price, it is considered one transaction. If only five transactions occur in a day, the volume for the day is five. Volume as Indicator ‘Volume’ Volume is an important indicator in technical analysis as…

Avoiding Wicked Bull Traps

5 Tips For Avoiding Wicked Bull Traps When buying into what appears to be a great stock breaking out of a base to claim higher highs there is nothing more frustrating then seeing your investment turn from promising to junk in a matter of days. As an investor you thought you had a potential winner on your end, but the stock falls off after the “breakout”. Congratulations, you were victimized by a bull trap. Bull and bear traps alike are commonly seen and can be very hard to avoid. Whether you…

Introduction To Price Action Trading

Beginners Introduction To Price Action Trading Price Action Trading Explained 1- The Definition Of Price Action Trading 2- Trading with “Messy” Vs “Clean” Forex Charts 3- How to identify trending and consolidating markets 4- How to trade Forex with Price Action Trading Strategies 5- How to use chart confluence and Price Action Signals What is Price Action Trading ? Basic Definition: Price Action Trading (P.A.T.) is the discipline of making all of your trading decisions from a stripped down or “naked” price chart. This means no lagging indicators outside of maybe…

Andrews’ Pitchfork trend channel tool

Andrews’ Pitchfork trend channel tool Introduction Developed by Alan Andrews, Andrews’ Pitchfork is a trend channel tool consisting of three lines. There is a median trend line in the center with two parallel equidistant trend lines on either side. These lines are drawn by selecting three points, usually based on reaction highs or lows moving from left to right on the chart. As with normal trend lines and channels, the outside trend lines mark potential support and resistance areas. A trend remains in place as long as the Pitchfork channel…

Flag Pennant Continuation Pattern

Flag Pennant Continuation pattern Flags and Pennants are short-term continuation patterns that mark a small consolidation before the previous move resumes. These patterns are usually preceded by a sharp advance or decline with heavy volume, and mark a midpoint of the move. Sharp Move: To be considered a continuation pattern, there should be evidence of a prior trend. Flags and pennants require evidence of a sharp advance or decline on heavy volume. These moves usually occur on heavy volume and can contain gaps. This move usually represents the first leg of a…

Heikin-Ashi Candlestick Chart

Heikin-Ashi Heikin-Ashi Candlesticks are an offshoot from Japanese candlesticks. Heikin-Ashi Candlesticks use the open-close data from the prior period and the open-high-low-close data from the current period to create a combo candlestick. The resulting candlestick filters out some noise in an effort to better capture the trend. In Japanese, Heikin means “average” and “ashi” means “pace” (EUDict.com). Taken together, Heikin-Ashi represents the average-pace of prices. Heikin-Ashi Candlesticks are not used like normal candlesticks. Dozens of bullish or bearish reversal patterns consisting of 1-3 candlesticks are not to be found. Instead,…

Bump and Run Reversal

Bump and Run Reversal Chart Pattern As the name implies, the Bump and Run Reversal (BARR) is a reversal pattern that forms after excessive speculation drives prices up too far, too fast. Developed by Thomas Bulkowski, the pattern was introduced in the June-97 issue of Technical Analysis of Stocks and Commodities and also included in his recently published book, the Encyclopedia of Chart Patterns. The pattern was originally named the Bump and Run Formation, or BARF. Bulkowski decided that Wall Street was not ready for such an acronym and changed…

Chart Patterns (2) – The Double Top Reversal

The Double Top Reversal Pattern The Double Top Reversal is a bearish reversal pattern typically found on bar charts, line charts and candlestick charts. As its name implies, the pattern is made up of two consecutive peaks that are roughly equal, with a moderate trough in-between. Note that a Double Top Reversal on a bar or line chart is completely different from Double Top Breakout on a P&F chart. Namely, Double Top Breakouts on P&F charts are bullish patterns that mark an upside resistance breakout. Although there can be variations, the classic…

Chart Patterns (1)

Introduction to Chart Patterns There are hundreds of thousands of market participants buying and selling securities for a wide variety of reasons: hope of gain, fear of loss, tax consequences, short-covering, hedging, stop-loss triggers, price target triggers, fundamental analysis, technical analysis, broker recommendations and a few dozen more. Trying to figure out why participants are buying and selling can be a daunting process. Chart patterns put all buying and selling into perspective by consolidating the forces of supply and demand into a concise picture. As a complete pictorial record of…